October 21, 2014 (updated 2019) Regeneration in Ancient Turkey Back Hand of Sabazius by Shannon Dorey


Back of Bronze Handhttps://www.tumblr.com/search/hand+of+sabazius

On the back of Sabazius' bronze hand, shown above, is a caduceus symbol, an ancient symbol which I associate with DNA. There is also a hook, which likewise appeared on the Dogon shrines and was identified with the Smith's hook and the stolen fire. The stolen fire was associated with our lost sun, which indirectly affected our DNA and was responsible for humans being turned into single sexed mortal beings.

A turtle and frog image also appear on the back of the hand. Frogs are amphibians like the Nummo and my research indicates they were a symbol of the Nummo in many ancient religions including the Goddess religion of Old Europe. The Greek goddess Artemis was worshiped as a toad in Egypt, Italy, and Lithuania and according to Marija Gimbutas, Sheela Na gig, a figure which has been found incorporated into old churches in medieval Ireland and England was none other than the ancient frog or toad goddess, the birth giver and regeneratrix inherited from the Neolithic.Shannon Dorey, Day of the Fish p.44 The Nummo were hermaphrodites but associated with the divine feminine and a breast appears on the frog in this image.

The Hogon and the heads of families kept a tortoise in their homes as the "guardian of the world" and gave it a bit of their food before meals.Shannon Dorey, The Nummo p.145 The turtle appears in the myths of many ancient cultures including those from North American Indigenous people, who refer to North America as turtle island.Shannon Dorey, The Nummo p.244

A key event in the Dogon relgion was the regeneration of Lébé to create the genetic make up of modern day humans. Lébé was born as a hermaphrodite but five generations after her/his birth, humans were born single-sexed.


Bronze hand 1st-2nd century CE.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sabazios#mediaviewer
/File:HandOfSabazius.JPG Author: Mike Young
Located at the British Museum

The figure on the bottom of the front of the bronze hand, which was used in the worship of the Thracian or Phrygian god Sabazius, appears to be inside an omphalos stone wrapped around with a cord. During the process when humans were created and regenerated, the individual being regenerated would be wrapped around with what the Dogon referred to as the "Cord of God". According to the Dogon, during the regeneration process the soul was transferred into the newly created body and the "Cord of God" became the new body's backbone.Shannon Dorey, The Rose p. 370


Cord of God? by Ji-Ellehttp://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:B%C3%A2ton_de_voleur_rituel_Dogon-Mus%C3%A9e_barrois.jpg

This Dogon wooden carving, which is displayed in the Museum Barrois in France, may be depicting the "Cord of God". This image is similar to the one on the bottom of the front of the Phrygian bronze hand above. Another important aspect of this Dogon carving which ties it to Ancient Phrygia is the donkey or ass ears. King Midas, the most famous of the Phrygian kings, was reported to have had donkey or ass's ears which he hid under a Phrygian cap.Robert Graves, The Greek Myths, p.283 (83.g)

The Nummo were associated with horses and antelopes and the donkey was another animal that I believe was identified with them. The ass or donkey appears in many ancient myths including Christianity where Christ rides a donkey into Jerusalem. The Satyr Silenus is described as riding an ass or donkey.Shannon Dorey, The Rose p. 382 The Syrian goddess Atargatis, who is depicted as Derceto with a human upper body and a fish tailed lower body, like descriptions of the Nummo Ancestors, also rode an ass or donkey.Shannon Dorey, The Rose p. 380 The Feast of the Donkey was a celebration that Fulcanelli describes in his Le Mystère des Cathédrales (The Mystery of the Cathedrals) as taking place in Notre-Dame Cathedral in Paris during the Middle Ages.Shannon Dorey, The Rose p. 382

When Lébé was regenerted, Ogotemmê said that the Nummo's womb had transformed Lébé's "bones into coloured stones, and ejected them into the bottom of the tomb so as to form the outline of a skeleton laid out flat on its back in the place where the body had been, with its head to the north." The dougué stones, which were vomitted forth from the Seventh Ancestor (the Mistress/Master of Speech) and laid out in the outline of a stretched out body, marked the joints of the pelvis and shoulders and where the limbs were attached. Lébé's soul was incorporated into the stones that became the regenerated body.

Like the Dogon Lébé, the Egyptian Osiris was born from the mouth of a serpent. 'Osiris entered the tail of a great serpent, was drawn through its body, came out through its mouth, and was then born anew.'"Shannon Dorey, The Master of Speech p.213


Maya Dresden CodexShannon Dorey, Day of the Fish p. 157

Regeneration also appears on page 27, of the Kingsborough and Förstemann versions of the Maya Dresden Codex shown above. The top of the image depicts a hand on a pole resembling a spine. The bronze hand from ancient Turkey was also meant to be attached to a pole for processional use in Thracian or Phrygian rituals.Dorey, The Rose p. 370

Strands are shown wrapped around a pole in the middle section along with a severed fish head. An eagle's head is being severed over top of a pot or cauldron in the bottom section and a serpent and fish appear. These severed heads suggest regeneration and the hand and footprints in this image may have meant the same things to the Maya as they did to the Dogon, which were genetic symbols. Heart shaped images appear on the bottom section, which are associated with regeneration in many ancient cultures including Greek mythology and which is discussed in Day of the Fish.Shannon Dorey, Day of the Fish p. 157 Hearts appear on the bottom of the Thracian Stele of Sabazius on the horse, shown in Part 1.

The similarities in these ancient beliefs always point back to the Dogon religion, which my research indicates to be the oldest form of these religions.

Refer to Part 1 for more on this bronze hand. Learn more about Dogon symbolism from my books, The Master (Mistress) of Speech, The Nummo and Day of the Fish and The Rose. Purchase all four books.